Transform your store into a physical website!

Technology in retail

All the evidence suggests that we as individuals enjoy and will continue to want the physical experience of shopping – 76% of customers in even developed countries say we prefer making purchases this way.  The ability to see, feel and try before buy is compelling. Even the tech-savvy younger consumer (and convenience driven) still craves for a physical shopping experience. For most of us shopping is also very much a family event. We enjoy visit to malls and like to spend time out there with the people we care. But at the same time, the customers have steadily getting hooked to best in-class consumer experience of the online world where the shopping is much more informed, transparent and personalized. The technology is helping online retailers to do the customer education on scale with the help of product content rich with images, videos, buying guides and wealth of information generated by massive crowd generated content aka customer reviews and discussions. The same customer when visits the physical outlet he feels underpowered and inferiorly tooled due to the absence of aids he / she enjoys in the online counter part of the store.

Lets take an example… 

The inferiority is not in few or particular use case; it’s all over the shopping floor. Let’s take an example of Joe, a fictitious consumer visiting a local digital multi-brand retail store, stocking everything sold under home appliances, consumer electronics and IT categories.  Joe wants to buy an Air Conditioner and is willing to spend wisely on good device (and believe me who will not!!). As Joe walks into the store, he looks for the AC section on the store map but it is unable to find it. Upon some asking around, he finds out that the AC section comes under the home appliances section on the second floor. Store maps have categories, but unlike online stores, lack subcategories. Joe was aware that AC’s have star rating for power consumption and higher rating and a higher rating will save him money on electricity. Hence, he decided to look for a modestly priced, high rated AC. He wanted to compare the prices and features of different brands based on their AC rating, price and features offered. Not satisfied with the specifications mentioned on the product display, Joe headed to the sales executive. After some questioning, Joe was not feeling confident about the sale executive’s answers as he did not seem to have complete knowledge about the more technical aspects of the products. This made Joe nervous about spending his money on a product he was unsure about. Joe asked for a recommendation from the store sales executive but did not find his argument entirely convincing partly because of loss of confidence due to weaker product know-how of the concerned executive and partly as executive could not explain why the suggestions are worthy through the customer testimonials and field trials. As result of this, Joe left the store without buying anything and the store has lost the sale!

Solution lies in using the right kind of technology in retail. 

Tablet based sales assistance

The average Joe experience is not new to all of us. Now and then we see this happen with ourselves and with other customers too. If the retail outlets can extend the experience they have on their web-stores and deploy consumer grade ICT to empower the floor executive, they can win back the consumer confidence and satisfaction greatly.

The retail sector currently employs large section of man-power in front end store operations, each of whom has the ability to affect customer experience in a positive or negative way. An engaged, motivated and informed store staff is arguably the retailer’s greatest asset, with the power to generate customer loyalty, increase sales and provide a personalized, rich shopping experience. When executives on the floor were surveyed, they agreed that they are often embarrassed due to the lack of product knowledge they have and that sometimes, a consumer has better knowledge than them about certain products. If the executives have digital tools to help them locate the products among the range of brands and then access the product content as well as do side-by-side a comparison based on features, price etc. They can serve the customers better as well as enhance their own product knowledge in general. These tools in the form of apps can be deployed on commercial grade on-the-go hardware-  a rugged tablets which could sustain the multi-user shop floor environment.

In-store information Kiosks

The multi-story stores have also found that customers are increasingly using the kiosks installed in the common areas like entrance and lobbies. Customers are exploring store-maps to get the directions as well find where the offers are running. The kiosks as well as assisted sales apps are also used by few savvy retailers to sell the stuff which is not in the stock currently. It’s really a win-win situation for both customers as well as retailers. Customers got what they want as they do not have to adjust by buying something else due to non-availability and retailers do not lose the sale!!

Working on the mobile platform…

For building and rolling this mobile platform, retailers do not have to look for expensive tech. Many of them are already investing in the digital platform for the online customers; they can extend the same platform and build engaging experience on top of the same content which is showcased on their or their vendor’s web properties. If the retailers have deployed right kind of technology for their retail online platform which can extend the digital assets with the help of cloud APIs, what is needed is to build an app targeted for the front end store staff. Make sure it mocks the in-store assisted sales experience. The same assets also can be extended to build a kiosk which can help consumers to explore the store-maps and offers running currently in the store. The mobile app technology will be responsible to manage the GUI where-in the data needed like product content including the department, sub-department (i.e. product taxonomy),  specifications as well media rich content (i.e. images, videos, how-to guides) can be delivered through the cloud APIs. The API’s would basically wrap the business logic and modeling aspects of the content and mobile app GUI will orchestrate the in-store workflows like assisted sales and product comparisons.

The enterprise web-store platforms are already equipped with the tools to manage this content along with powerful catalog management systems. The catalog management system has MDM tools to create taxonomy and then assign attributes for each node in the taxonomy. The product content published then will be stored in multiple data storage systems as per the type of content in the cloud itself. The cloud APIs mentioned earlier will use this content and deliver it to the mobile apps based on the access rules defined. Leveraging the web store technology helps retailers not only save cost in acquiring new technology stack but also avoids duplication of content management and publication efforts. The cloud being omnipresent, the data can be also utilized for all the future platforms and innovations seamlessly too. The next gen enterprise web-store platforms has also sensed this opportunity and quickly rolling out their own integrated mobile platforms helping retailers leverage the content to convert the physical stores to physical websites, literally!

 

Comparison of MartJack and Magento eCommerce Platforms

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MartJack vs Magento eCommerce platform

We have compared our services to that of Magento in the table below on the basis of difference in capabilities. You are the best judge to take a call after reading this!

3 Lessons to Learn from the Marks and Spencer’s eCommerce fiasco

Marks and Spencer eCommerce case study

Marks and Spencer eCommerce case study

The British retail giant, Marks and Spencer, experienced a dramatic reduction in the growth of its online sales from +20% to -8.1%. Just half of the 6 million users had re-registered on its new website. Additionally, owing to the lost user data, the user’s experience on the new website was not personalised yet, as in the old website.

Offline vs Marketplaces: brands choose sides in retail war

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Brand Offline vs Online

India’s $500 billion retail sector seems to be in cold sweat due to a much smaller section of online retail.  Despite accounting for less than 1% of the Indian retail market, eCommerce remains by far the fastest growing channel. “Showrooming” – a concept where buyers examine a product offline and ultimately buy online is becoming increasingly popular in the Indian context due to heavy discounts and attractive offers. Moreover, electronics unlike apparel can be bought without touching and feeling as quality is assured by the brand you are buying. Hence, this heavy weight segment has seen a 60% annual online growth in India, a lot of which can be credited to heavy discounts and slashed prices offered by online retailers. However, these are starting to hurt the lifeline of manufacturers – offline retailers.

eCommerce expectations: What women want from online shopping

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Gone are the days when “Window shopping” referred to a kind of shopping done by a consumer who did not want to purchase goods, however browsed around a store only for killing time or marking it for later purchase. I’d prefer window shopping now to be understood as shopping done from windows, the Microsoft version.  Jokes apart, we are in an era where my maid asked my mom to order Dove soap online because that was not available in the local vendor and she is too lazy to go to hypermarkets. That is the amount of evolution online shopping in India has witnessed. As stereotyping goes that word shopping is mostly associated with women, when it boils down to online shopping, the same holds true.